Category Archives: Georgia Homeschooling Information & Updates

What About Socialization?

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As a homeschooler, one of the questions I am asked most often is “Aren’t you worried about socialization?” To which I typically respond, “Yes, I am that is why I homeschool.” In all seriousness though, you may be legitimately concerned about the dreaded “S” word. So, I am going to share some of what I have learned with you.

The actual definition of socialization is the process by which human infants begin to acquire the skills necessary to perform as a functioning member of their society. For most of us, we learn naturally through our everyday experiences how to “function”. This can come from spending time with family, visiting the grocery store, going to church, or extracurricular activities. To “be socialized” means that one must be able to function in society. One does not have to send their child to public school to achieve this.

Now, everyone knows that “one” homeschooler who was a social misfit right? Think back to public school, did you ever know someone who was a little “different’. I am betting you did. A child’s social make up is not going to change if they are in public school. Some are naturally shy. Or naturally “awkward”, whether or not your child is homeschooled will not play a part in their social demeanor.

Your child can enjoy numerous activities as a homeschooler. Your kids can meet friends through church, scouts, co-ops, on field trips, sports, 4-H or another activity that they choose to participate in. Most homeschoolers I know are actually very active, and in the 5+ years I have been homeschooling I have never met an “unsocial” homeschooler.

Another thing to consider in regards to socialization and your child is that in public school you rarely have the opportunity to get to know your children’s friends. With homeschooling, you become friends with the parents your children are around. You get to know their families, and the values they have. In my opinion, this is an awesome perk!

I remember when I was in public school we were often reprimanded for “socializing”. I doubt very seriously anyone whose kids go to public school will say they send them to school to learn “socialization”. The children are there for an education, as a homeschooler, you are giving your child that education.

Now, there may be times when you second-guess what your child may be “missing” out on by not attending public school. When this happens, remember all the other things they are “missing” out on. Bullies, school violence, common core, bad language, homework…. The list goes on and on. For every “fun” thing (like prom) your child may miss there are others you should be glad they are missing. Don’t let the dreaded “S” word second-guess yourself or the calling to educate your children that God has given you.

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a free Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

 

 

 

 

Must Haves For Back to Homeschool

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It is back to school time! Some parents may cringe, some parents may get excited, and for most homeschool parents it means “stock up” time. I hit the aisles at our local Wal-Mart as soon as back to school sales start. Here are my must haves for back to homeschool:

  1. Good Pencils, not the cheap $1 ones! I recommend the Ticonderoga brand.
  2. A great pencil sharpener. I was so excited when I bought an old style pencil sharpener for our homeschool. The manual ones last longer than the electric ones, but no matter which way you go I would recommend investing in one.
  3. Red ink pens are necessary because like it or not you will be grading papers. And, sometimes kids make mistakes :)
  4. A great Homeschool Planner. I highly recommend The Well Planned Day, but there are also great planners online free.
  5. Binders are great to purchase for teacher planning, and homeschool portfolios
  6. Crayons, I typically buy 30 boxes each year. This gives each child a new box every month.
  7. Glue sticks are a must! I buy enough of these to get us through all school year. You will also want to buy bottles of glue, and maybe some tacky glue for crafts.
  8. Notebooks, kids love these to draw in and use for school. You can typically get this for around 15 cents apiece during back to school sales.

These are just a few items that I think are must haves for back to school. So, check your local ads, make your list and get shopping for back to homeschool!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a free Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

Homeschooling for Free?

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A common question many new homeschoolers ask is how expensive is homeschooling? The short answer is that homeschooling is as expensive as you allow it to be. There is curriculum out there that can fit any budget, from a substantial amount, all the way down to free. Yes, that’s right free!

Here are just a few of many free websites out there offering free curriculum.

Khan Academy: Free math website complete with videos and tutorials for a variety of different areas in math.

Classical House of Learning : A place for FREE classical literature guides following a 4-year history cycle.

Easy Peasy All in One Homeschool: A free comprehensive homeschool program for student’s preschool through 8th grade.

Homeschool Share: Free Lapbooks for the Little Ones J

Ambleside Online: Ambleside Online is a free curriculum using the Charlotte Mason philosophy of education.

ABC Jesus Loves Me: is a complete preschool Bible themed curriculum.

Bible Road Trip: A free three Year Bible program for children and adults.  

Starfall.com: Phonics site perfect for those who are learning to read.

Spelling City: Free spelling games and activities for kids.

Scott Foresman Reading: Free printable grammar and writing sheets for students in grades 1-6.

In addition to these great sites there are many other resources available right at your local library. Rebecca Rupp offers a book titled Home Learning Year by Year. This book includes recommendations for numerous resources that are available to create your own homeschool curriculum. Many of these are probably located in your town’s library. I have used this book for years and have found it invaluable.

Also, many libraries offer teachers kits. These kits are available on a variety of subjects. They may include crafts, books, audio, and many other resources. Check and see if your library has any to offer.

You tube and Netflix have many educational videos for kids. One show that my children love to watch on Netflix is the Magic School Bus. Another great one that is on You Tube is Liberty Kids. It is all about American History during the Revolutionary War.

These are just a few resources that I have used or found that are free and great homeschooling resources. If your budget is tight, and you’re not sure how you can fit homeschool curriculum into the budget, I encourage you to check out these resources. Even if your budget isn’t tight, we all love things that are free, right?

Author: Misty Bailey

Misty is a homeschool mom of three and has been homeschooling for over 4 years. You can read about her homeschool journey and more on her blog, Joy in the Journey.

Homeschooling in Georgia: A Quick Guide

Homeschooling in Georgia

The state of Georgia is one of the best states to home school your child. Georgia’s laws are friendly to home schoolers and allow you a lot of freedom in the education of your child and minimal oversight.

Why and How to Homeschool in Georgia

Let’s admit it. Public schools and large classrooms don’t work for everyone. Or maybe your local area doesn’t have a quality public school. Whatever the reason, you’re on this website because you know public schools aren’t the best options for your children.

The research on homeschooling is clear (I would suggest linking to my article on homeschool statistics), homeschooled students drastically outperform their public school peers according to peer reviewed studies. Top colleges like Stanford love homeschooled applicants, and encourage them to apply. It’s likely your child won’t receive enough personalized attention in a public school, and will be working at other children’s pace, not his own. But at home, you’ll be able to make sure your child is learning at a challenging yet fun pace. I highly suggest homeschooling if you want your child to excel and prosper.

Home school Laws in Georgia

The home school laws in Georgia only require you to follow a few basic requirements that are easy to comply with. You are supposed to send in a declaration of intent within 30 days of starting a home school program, or by September 1st after the first year. This declaration will just contain some basic information including the children’s age and names, the dates of the school year, as well as the home school address. You’re only allowed to educate your own children in a home school. Also you must hold a GED or high school diploma.

You must teach reading, language arts, mathematics and social science in your home school.   Additionally the school year must be a minimum length of 180 days of 4.5 hours of teaching. Your child must also undergo standardized testing every 3 years and you must maintain those records.   In Georgia you’re not required to submit attendance records.   Overall, homeschooling in GA is simple and gives you a huge amount of freedom to teach your child as you wish.

You do need to keep in mind that Georgia educational department will not provide homeschooling materials or curriculum. You will have to therefore supply those on your own or through a home school program.

Home School Programs in GA

A great way to enhance your family’s home schooling experience is to meet other home schooling families. This is a great way to improve both you and your children’s social lives. Many local support groups often hold group field trips, barbeques, and parties. Additionally, other parents can help provide guidance and tips in regards to homeschooling and give you a supportive community.   If you haven’t decided whether you want to home school your children yet, these groups can give you an insider’s view into the lives of homeschoolers.  

Another excellent resource is your local library. Local libraries often hold events, read-a-thons, and other events that allow your children to both socialize and learn. Local libraries additionally are excellent resources for learning material, books, movies, and other materials. Not to mention that they make amazing places for research trips with your children. A local library is a homeschooling parent’s best friend.

Conclusion

Learning how to homeschool in Georgia is a worthy investment in your children’s futures.   The laws regarding homeschooling in Georgia give you a great amount of freedom in educating your children. Homeschooling provides a superior alternative to public school that will propel your children past their public school peers. Additionally there are many local homeschool support groups so that you have support and help in homeschooling your children.

 

How Does Your Child Learn?

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Chances are, you have an understanding of how you learn. You may be the type that needs to read something to figure it out, you may need to see something in action to understand. There are six different types of ways people learn. Figuring out what type of learner your child (and you) are will help you figure out how your child learns and will be very beneficial in your homeschool.

Here is a breakdown of the different types of learners you may have:

  •  Visual (spatial): Your child may prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.
  • Aural (auditory-musical): Your child learns better while listening to music or other sounds.
  • Verbal (linguistic): Your child may prefer using words, both in speech and writing.
  • Physical (kinesthetic): Your child learns better while moving or using his body, hands, and sense of touch.
  • Logical (mathematical): Your child needs to understand the logic, reasoning and systems
  • Social (interpersonal): Your child may prefer to learn in groups or with other people.
  • Solitary (intrapersonal): Your child prefers to work alone and use self-study.

If you are not sure how your child learns, think about these different types of learners. Does your child love to read, and research information (Verbal or Visual)? Is he always on the go, and unable to sit still during Math (Physical)? Does he need a quiet place to read and study (Solitary)?

If you are not sure how your child learns there are different types of online and paper quizzes out there that can help you determine his and your learning style. There are also books, and online information that can help you narrow it down.

Chances are you may have a child who learns differently than you. I am a verbal learner. I need to read information to fully understand it. My children, are more kinesthetic learners. This means that textbooks don’t work well in our family unless they are accompanied by hands on activities. Learning this about my children helped me figure out the best way to teach them.

Once you realize what type of learner your child is you will have a much easier time actually teaching them. As your child’s teacher, you can adapt your methods to better suit each of your children. This luxury is something that public schools cannot offer their students! So, take advantage of it. Study your child, find out how they learn, and offer them that customized education that only homeschooling offers!

Author: Misty Bailey

Misty is a homeschool mom of three and has been homeschooling for over 4 years. You can read about her homeschool journey and more on her blog, Joy in the Journey.