Category Archives: New to Homeschooling

Can Someone Else Homeschool My Child?

Someone else can homeschool my child

As a homeschool mentor in our local homeschool group, I have been asked a few times “Can someone else homeschool my child?”. This question stems from a variety of scenarios and comes from aunts, or grandparents having custody of their family members, foster or adoptive parents, or from parents who may have to work outside the home full time and has someone else willing to educate them while the parent is at work. The answer is dependent on where one lives. Some states allow it, some do not.

One thing to consider in regards to homeschooling another person’s child is that homeschooling ultimately is the parent’s responsibility. That being said there are cases when a parent cannot step into that role full time. Sometimes a grandparent, aunt, or friend can come in and help the child. However, the parent is still responsible for the education of that child.

For example, if mom works outside the home 3 days a week, and grandma watches the children and makes sure school is done on those days, she is filling in for mom. However, mom leaves the assignments, mom makes sure the work is complete, and mom grades the papers. Mom is still in charge of the child’s education.

Another scenario may be that your child is having a hard time mastering geometry. You hire a college student from your church to come in one day a week and tutor your child. This is not someone else homeschooling your child. This is asking and receiving help. The parent is still in charge of their child’s education.

In the case where the parent is not in the picture, and an aunt or grandparent steps in, I highly recommend seeking legal counsel. Maybe a temporary custody agreement should be met, or a contract set up. The education of someone else’s children is one that should not be taken on lightly.

Can I homeschool another person’s child? Here is the answer from HSLDA:

It depends on the homeschool law for your state (find your state’s law here). Please read it carefully to determine whether you may homeschool a child who is not yours. Even if homeschooling someone else’s child is legal in your state, HSLDA will not defend your right to teach a child other than your own. This is because our mission is to defend and advance the constitutional right of parents to direct the upbringing and education of their own children.

In regards to foster and adopted children the answer from HSLDA is:

Parents may homeschool their adopted children. However, if you are a foster parent, the option of homeschooling is determined by your caseworker.

If you are considering homeschooling another person’s child, please check out the laws for your state. If you are wondering if someone else can homeschool your child, remember that as a parent, you are the one solely responsible for your child’s education. Seeking help is one thing, but the education of your child rests on you. You can read the laws about parental responsibility and homeschooling for your state here.

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

Homeschooling and Grade Placement

Grade placement in homeschool

I recently shared a shocking homeschool confession post on my blog. In that post, I also shared that I don’t worry about what the grade number is on the front of my children’s books. One of the luxuries of homeschooling is that we don’t have to work on grade level. We can let our kids work at their own pace. This is a luxury for them, and us.

When you first begin homeschooling, you may assume that you can go with whatever grade they “should” be in. But, that is not always the case. I have found that some homeschool curriculums work about a ½-grade level above where our local public schools work. Some curriculum companies work below where our local schools are. You cannot trust the number on the front of a homeschool curriculum and assume it is “grade level appropriate”.

When thinking about where to place your child there are numerous things you can do to properly place them into a curriculum. Check the publishing company’s website and see if they offer grade placement tests. These tests are usually free and can be downloaded onto your computer and printed out. They will likely tell you about where your child should be placed in the publisher’s curriculum.

Another thing you may want to do is see the curriculum in person. This can be done at a convention, through a local homeschool friend who may use the curriculum, or at a curriculum swap and sell. This helps a lot because there may b some material in a curriculum your child has covered, and some they haven’t.

As homeschoolers, we can let our children work at their own pace. They don’t have to worry about what the number on the front of the book says as long as they are mastering the material along the way. Some people do consider grade levels important and where we live we do have to share what grade level our children are in when we turn in our notification. In this case I would consider what grade they WOULD be in if they attended public school. If someone asks my children, what grade they are in they will tell them. This helps in Sunday school classes, Jr church programs, scouts, and sports. Grade levels are not bad; they just aren’t always necessary or accurate when it comes to actual curriculum.

So, when thinking about grade placement for your homeschool child, for record keeping purposes, go with the grade they would be in if they attended public school. For curriculum purposes go with where they place academically and don’t worry about the number on the front of the book! Let them work at their own pace, regardless of what “grade” that may be!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

Reasons Not to Homeschool

Reasons Not to Homeschool

As a homeschooler, I am sure you have heard many excuses as to why people can’t homeschool.  Many times these reasons are honestly just excuses, and that is fine. Despite the many advantages of homeschooling, I understand that it is NOT for everyone. However, I have had to ask myself through the years, are there legitimate reasons not to homeschool? And, I have found that there actually are!

  1. Money will sometimes be nonexistent. Most homeschool families live on one income. If this will be your family, you may find that sometimes, the budget will be tight. What does this mean? It means that the pay for all your hard work will be hugs and kisses, and that things like fancy clothes, new minivans, or six figure homes will probably not happen! If you like these things and don’t want to tighten your budget….don’t homeschool!
  2. You are the only one responsible for your child’s education. You cannot blame the teacher, principal, school, or anyone else if your child is not learning. If you don’t want this responsibility, don’t homeschool!
  3. Because everyone else is doing it. Just because all your friends are homeschooling doesn’t mean that you should. If you are considering homeschooling to follow the crowd, I encourage you to fully weigh your decision. Homeschooling is hard, and you will need encouragement, and the desire to continue on the homeschooling journey. If you are homeschooling just to follow the crowd…don’t homeschool!
  4. Your spouse is not in agreement. In order for homeschooling to work you must be in agreement with your spouse. Otherwise, it will never work. Homeschooling requires a united front. If one wants to homeschool, and the other doesn’t then take the time to pray about the decision, research, and fully understand the concerns your spouse may have. If an agreement is not made then don’t homeschool!
  5. You will absolutely fall in love with homeschooling! Homeschooling will probably take over your house J You will have messes, books everywhere, and freedom to educate your children in the way you see fit. You will know your child’s friends, and you will know what they are learning. You will be the one teaching them to read, which is an amazing feeling. You will also get to show them the real world not the walls of a classroom. This is fun! And once you start there is NO turning back, you won’t want to. If you don’t want to chance falling in love with homeschooling then…don’t homeschool!

 

Author: Misty Bailey

Misty is a homeschool mom of three and has been homeschooling for over 4 years. You can read about her homeschool journey and more on her blog, Joy in the Journey.

Homeschooling for Free?

childrenreading

A common question many new homeschoolers ask is how expensive is homeschooling? The short answer is that homeschooling is as expensive as you allow it to be. There is curriculum out there that can fit any budget, from a substantial amount, all the way down to free. Yes, that’s right free!

Here are just a few of many free websites out there offering free curriculum.

Khan Academy: Free math website complete with videos and tutorials for a variety of different areas in math.

Classical House of Learning : A place for FREE classical literature guides following a 4-year history cycle.

Easy Peasy All in One Homeschool: A free comprehensive homeschool program for student’s preschool through 8th grade.

Homeschool Share: Free Lapbooks for the Little Ones J

Ambleside Online: Ambleside Online is a free curriculum using the Charlotte Mason philosophy of education.

ABC Jesus Loves Me: is a complete preschool Bible themed curriculum.

Bible Road Trip: A free three Year Bible program for children and adults.  

Starfall.com: Phonics site perfect for those who are learning to read.

Spelling City: Free spelling games and activities for kids.

Scott Foresman Reading: Free printable grammar and writing sheets for students in grades 1-6.

In addition to these great sites there are many other resources available right at your local library. Rebecca Rupp offers a book titled Home Learning Year by Year. This book includes recommendations for numerous resources that are available to create your own homeschool curriculum. Many of these are probably located in your town’s library. I have used this book for years and have found it invaluable.

Also, many libraries offer teachers kits. These kits are available on a variety of subjects. They may include crafts, books, audio, and many other resources. Check and see if your library has any to offer.

You tube and Netflix have many educational videos for kids. One show that my children love to watch on Netflix is the Magic School Bus. Another great one that is on You Tube is Liberty Kids. It is all about American History during the Revolutionary War.

These are just a few resources that I have used or found that are free and great homeschooling resources. If your budget is tight, and you’re not sure how you can fit homeschool curriculum into the budget, I encourage you to check out these resources. Even if your budget isn’t tight, we all love things that are free, right?

Author: Misty Bailey

Misty is a homeschool mom of three and has been homeschooling for over 4 years. You can read about her homeschool journey and more on her blog, Joy in the Journey.

Beginning Homeschooling

Mom with Laptop Beginning Homeschooling

Are you wondering if homeschooling might be the lifestyle for your family? Does the appeal of nurturing the flames of learning in your child, speak loudly to you? Maybe the frustration of seeing your child’s special gifts (or needs) being overlooked edges you toward the leap of home education. The speakers of Homeschooling 101 bring years of experience to bear on all of your questions. Answering those heart-wearying questions about socialization, patience and how-to opens the conference day. Understanding curriculum options, nurturing preschoolers into a lifetime love of learning and accepting your limitations are all part of the day.

Homeschooling for Excellence 101 helps questioning parents flesh out a plan for their family. In a small group, personal setting questions and concerns are answered by experienced homeschooling mothers. Children ages four and up have a workshop option of their own: KidsZone. While you explore home education, your young ones will explore fun learning with folks who share a love of learning and children! The lifestyle of home education knits the hearts of families together in a very unique way. If you would like to know more about this incredible opportunity for education, make time to attend the Homeschooling 101 conference at the Homeschool Expo! This one-day conference takes place one day before the Expo and provides admission for the entire Expo weekend.