Tag Archives: homeschool learning

How Do Homeschoolers Perform Long Term?

How do Homeschoolers perform long term

We already know that homeschool students perform well academically, but how do they do long term? Do they turn in to socially inept adults? Do they thrive at college? How do homeschoolers perform long term?

Do Homeschooled students go to college?

Yes! Over 74% of homeschooled graduates have taken some form of college level courses. Compare that to 46% of the general population.

How do homeschool students perform academically in college?

Compared to conventional students, college students who were homeschooled earn, on average a higher first year GPA (3.41) than the overall average (3.12) a higher fourth year GPA (3.46) than the overall average (3.16) and have a higher college graduation rate (66.7%) compared to the overall average (57.5%).

Once in College, how do homeschooled students do socially?

Recent studies have found that whether or not a student is homeschooled has no affect on their self esteem in college. However, these students do have a significantly lower rate of depression, and tend to rate their college experiences more positively than students who were not homeschooled.

Does the family bonds made by homeschooling last?

Yes! The bonds made with  family members during homeschooling, last a lifetime. Homeschooled children are more likely to adopt the behaviors and values of their family members because they are ones they spend the most time with.

Are Homeschoolers active in their communities after graduation?

Yes! Homeschool graduates tend to participate regularly in community services. They are also 50% more likely to be members of organizations like a church or synagogue.

How do homeschoolers feel about homeschooling once they are adults?

The majority of adults who were homeschooled plan on homeschooling their own children. They also tend to have no negative feelings about their education.

So, if you have been wondering what the long term affects of homeschooling are I hope this has given you some peace about your decision. I have found no long term disadvantages of homeschooling. Homeschooling is a great education choice for many families, and the advantages will always outweigh the doubts you may have!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

 

Homeschooling a Reluctant Learner

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Do you have a child who just doesn’t like school? Everything seems like a chore when it comes to learning. They don’t want to do math, reading is a bore, and getting them to sit and concentrate is a near impossible task…. If this is your child, you may have a reluctant learner. Most kids are reluctant in school at some point in their education career, but reluctant learners are different. They really don’t seem to like school. At all.  Here are some tips for homeschooling a reluctant learner.

Debunk the Myth

What is the myth? The myth is that your child doesn’t want to learn. That is not true. All children WANT to learn. Whether it be how to play the new minecraft game, or how to climb the tree they are gazing at out the window. The key is to find out what it is that they WANT to learn.

Slow Down

Don’t push. Really. Who says a child HAS to read at five? If reading is hard, slow down, and pick it up in a few months. Forcing a child to learn something they are not ready for can cause emotional stress on the child, and exasperation for you. Let them work at their own pace. That is the beauty of homeschooling.

Set Goals

What does your child like? Figure that out and set a goal. You can have X for 10 minutes AFTER we finish this page of math. The key is to get them to want to finish their work, in order to move on to the next thing.

You can set bigger goals for the weeks accomplishments. If you finish all your assignments this week, we will have pizza for dinner on Friday. Or something along those lines. Find out what excites them and use it to your advantage.

Get Them Involved

What do they want to learn about? Find out and tailor your lessons around that. Unit studies may be a great approach for the reluctant learner because all the lessons are focused on one topic. I had a friend whose child was fascinated with tornadoes. That is all he wanted to talk about or learn about. So, she did a study on tornadoes, for a MONTH! The science of them, the history of the worst tornadoes, math related to how long they travel, books and spelling lists related to tornadoes, it was a LOT about tornadoes. BUT, he learned, and not reluctantly. Because it was something he was interested in.

Having a reluctant learner can be a challenge, but you can homeschool your child! Find out what interests them, slow down, and get them involved. These tips will help make your days a little smoother.

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a free Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

 

How Does Your Child Learn?

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Chances are, you have an understanding of how you learn. You may be the type that needs to read something to figure it out, you may need to see something in action to understand. There are six different types of ways people learn. Figuring out what type of learner your child (and you) are will help you figure out how your child learns and will be very beneficial in your homeschool.

Here is a breakdown of the different types of learners you may have:

  •  Visual (spatial): Your child may prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.
  • Aural (auditory-musical): Your child learns better while listening to music or other sounds.
  • Verbal (linguistic): Your child may prefer using words, both in speech and writing.
  • Physical (kinesthetic): Your child learns better while moving or using his body, hands, and sense of touch.
  • Logical (mathematical): Your child needs to understand the logic, reasoning and systems
  • Social (interpersonal): Your child may prefer to learn in groups or with other people.
  • Solitary (intrapersonal): Your child prefers to work alone and use self-study.

If you are not sure how your child learns, think about these different types of learners. Does your child love to read, and research information (Verbal or Visual)? Is he always on the go, and unable to sit still during Math (Physical)? Does he need a quiet place to read and study (Solitary)?

If you are not sure how your child learns there are different types of online and paper quizzes out there that can help you determine his and your learning style. There are also books, and online information that can help you narrow it down.

Chances are you may have a child who learns differently than you. I am a verbal learner. I need to read information to fully understand it. My children, are more kinesthetic learners. This means that textbooks don’t work well in our family unless they are accompanied by hands on activities. Learning this about my children helped me figure out the best way to teach them.

Once you realize what type of learner your child is you will have a much easier time actually teaching them. As your child’s teacher, you can adapt your methods to better suit each of your children. This luxury is something that public schools cannot offer their students! So, take advantage of it. Study your child, find out how they learn, and offer them that customized education that only homeschooling offers!

Author: Misty Bailey

Misty is a homeschool mom of three and has been homeschooling for over 4 years. You can read about her homeschool journey and more on her blog, Joy in the Journey.

 

Always More to Learn

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Education is not quite as mysterious as it sometimes seems.  The truth is that education is a line upon line, precept upon precept project that never ends.  Homeschooling recognizes that all of life is learning, and we seek to create life-long learners.  Education is not confined to a classroom; it is life itself.  While that sounds like an intimidating reality, it is a comforting one.  As the homeschool journey unfolds, we realize that each year simply allows us to build on knowledge gained previously.  It is an exciting journey.  It reminds us why the foundation is critical.

Math is the simple example.  Basic math facts develop into complicated algebraic equations over the years.  But every subject shows us the exciting truth of learning’s progression.  In elementary school we learn there was a deadly plague that devastated Europe in the 1300s.  In high school we learn how the disease spread and begin to understand its impact on art, public policy and even the psyche.  In Science our primary age children learn that some foods are healthier than others.  In High School, nutritional complexities deepen to unveil nutrient transport to cells and healing potential within foods.  Each layer of knowledge adds to the earlier layers and opens the door to exciting applications.

Keeping the progressive nature of education in mind quiets the fears when the process stalls.  It helps us remember building takes time.  Sometimes new facts pile up too rapidly and review is needed to reset the foundation.  Other times minds grab facts too quickly and erroneous conclusions are jumped to because knowledge pieces are missing.   Helping children hook new materials onto existing knowledge is a key to progress.  In fact, that is the goal of an educator:  find a place of understanding a child can put information upon and build a higher structure.   The process is the destination! 

-Billie Jo