Tag Archives: homeschool

4 Reasons to Homeschool High School

4 Reasons to Homeschool High School

Homeschooling High School. This is a time when many parents being on the whole homeschooling thing. Why? They find it too intimidating. Too hard. They feel like they aren’t smart enough, or want their kids to have a REAL diploma.

Iknow. I always said by the time high school came around I’d be singing the kids up for online public school. But, then I realized something.
It’s not that hard to homeschool high school! Believe me, my friend Ann wrote all about it.

By the time you are homeschooling high school your kids will be pretty well independent learners. This means LESS supervision, and more responsibility on their shoulders. This is not a bad thing.

Homeschooling high school also offers amazing benefits to both parents and kids.

Reduced Peer Pressure

Listen, I hated high school. Yes, I liked my friends and prom. But, high school kind of stunk. You are pressured in so many different directions, and the lack of parental supervision often leads to trouble.

By homeschooling high school, your kids won’t experience as much peer pressure. Yes, it may still be there to an extent from homeschool group or even youth group, but the level will be a lot less

You can provide a higher quality program

Who knows your children better than you? No one! THismeans that if you are reaising a budding writer, you know to invest in a quality writing program. Have a child interested in veterinary medicine? Zoology and vet science is hwer eyou want to focus. Homeschooling allows you the opportunity to offer your high schooler resources that can strengthen the areas they hope to study in college. It also allows you to tailor their education to improve weaker areas while highlighint their strengths. There is not eaching to the middle. Students can push past their comfort zones in areas where the excel and spend extra time in areas where they struggle. There are no boundaries, and that is a great thing!

You are providing your high schooler with real life experiences

Let’s face it, high school is fake. When will a child ever again spend a whole day with kids their own age? NEVER.  Homeschoolers are able to experience real life opportunities everyday. They have a flexible schedule and are able to regularly take learning opportunities outside the classroom.

Have a student who is interested in graphic design? They can shadow a successful graphic designer in the middle of the day on a school day! Have a student who is interested in auto body, photography, medicine? Same thing.  The ability to career sample or even apprentice is HUGE at this age, and can allow your high schooler to truly experience what life would be like on that career path. This is a real life experience that many high schools can’t offer.

 More Time for Special Talents

Homeschoolers are tearing up spelling and geography bees, music and robotics competitions and more. Why? They often have more time to pursue these special talents than their public school counterparts. No homework means more time to focus on their interest. No set schedule means they can practice an instrument for hours instead of minutes due to moving on to the next class.

The last four years at home is a huge stepping stone for our teenagers academic and spirutal lives. The teen years are foten deemed challangeing and yes, that may somtiems be true, but what better time to spend training up your children than those formative years. You will have the ability to watch them rise above societiesy expectations and can help them mature in godliness and focus on their own unique gifts and talents.

These are just a few of the many reasons to homeschool high school!

Misty Bailey is a work at home homeschool, mom.  She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments of her blog Joy in the Journey.

3 Tips for Homeschool Organization

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So, you’ve decided to homeschool! Great! Maybe you’ve been at it a few years, maybe you’re new to the whole thing, but one thing’s for certain. You’ve realized how much STUFF comes along with homeschooling!

Homeschool organization is important in homeschooling, yes, you can homeschool even if you’re not organized, but being a little organized will help a lot.

Here are three tips for homeschool organization that will help you on your homeschooling organization.

Everything has a place

When it comes to your homeschool supplies, books, and materials everything needs to have a place.  Here are a few ways you can do this:

  • Bookshelves-Each child can have a shelf for their school books. Keep a shelf for your teacher’s books too!
  • Drawers-Small plastic drawers like these can be a huge help in keeping a place for things like crayons, scissors and glue.
  • Bins- Bins like these are perfect for play doh, craft supplies, paint and other items.

When everything has a place you will not lose valuable time searching for items that you need!

Put Things Away

When you are done with items, put them away. Right then. Not later in the day, not when you have time, but right then. Teach your children the same thing. This eliminates the possibility of things getting lost or ruined because they have been left out. It also keeps you and your family more organized!

Find a Good Filing System

This has been HUGE for our homeschool organization. We use a simple file stacker that has 3 places. One of these is for items that need graded one for items that are graded and one for items that need to be filed in the kid’s portfolio. Having a good filing system will let you know what needs graded, it helps your kids know what’s been graded, and what they can put away, and it helps you know what you need to file for your homeschool records.

Homeschool organization does not have to be difficult. With these three simple tips you can be on your way to a more organized homeschool!

Misty Bailey is a work at home homeschool mom.  She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

3 Tips to Teaching a Child to Read

Here are a few tips that can help when teaching a child to read. #3 is great!

Years ago when I was longing to be a teacher, my desired grade was 1st. Why? Because at the time this is the grade when teachers taught their students to read. I LOVED reading, and volunteered throughout Jr. High, High School and College in the reading lab.

When I first began homeschooling I started out with an eager 5 year old who was longing to read. We purchased the curriculum and got to work. To my surprise it wasn’t as easy as I thought it’d be! Fast forward 6 years and I am working on my 5th reader (2 of my own, 3 extras). I have learned a few things about what works, and what doesn’t. Here are three tips to teaching a child to read.

Immerse them in Books

From the womb we have read to our children. As infants we offered sensory books, as toddlers we offered board books, and at preschool age we began reading good quality literature. We have immersed our kids in books at a young age, and so far it has paid off!

Kids LOVE books! IF they are offered to them. In order to create a reader you have to encourage a love of reading in your kids. Reading often will give your children the longing to learn to read themselves. It will create in them a love of reading that will last a lifetime.

Be Patient

I am not the most patient person, and sadly that shows in our beloved phonics curriculum. In the first book there are pencil marks where I circled words over and over again that my daughter missed. I remember those moments; I remember the tears and the frustration (from both of us). And, I have left the pencil marks there. Why? As a reminder that patience pays off. The second book has little to no pencil marks in it, and you know what? She breezed through that book.

Patience is SO important when it comes to teaching a child to read. Patience builds confidence; and confidence is a skill that is required for learning to read. If a child does not feel confident in their own abilities they will not offer their best work. So, be patient!

Be an Example

This goes along to an extent with being patient. Modeling patience will encourage our children to be patient while they are learning. BUT, we should also model a love of reading. Let your children see you read, take them to the library, let them see you checking out books, let them see that reading is something fun to do. By being an example, you will encourage your child in their own reading endeavors.

These are just a few tips that can help when teaching a child to read. Come back next week as we take a look at some of the best reading curriculums!

Misty Bailey is a work at home homeschool mom.  She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

 

 

Homeschooling a Reluctant Learner

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Do you have a child who just doesn’t like school? Everything seems like a chore when it comes to learning. They don’t want to do math, reading is a bore, and getting them to sit and concentrate is a near impossible task…. If this is your child, you may have a reluctant learner. Most kids are reluctant in school at some point in their education career, but reluctant learners are different. They really don’t seem to like school. At all.  Here are some tips for homeschooling a reluctant learner.

Debunk the Myth

What is the myth? The myth is that your child doesn’t want to learn. That is not true. All children WANT to learn. Whether it be how to play the new minecraft game, or how to climb the tree they are gazing at out the window. The key is to find out what it is that they WANT to learn.

Slow Down

Don’t push. Really. Who says a child HAS to read at five? If reading is hard, slow down, and pick it up in a few months. Forcing a child to learn something they are not ready for can cause emotional stress on the child, and exasperation for you. Let them work at their own pace. That is the beauty of homeschooling.

Set Goals

What does your child like? Figure that out and set a goal. You can have X for 10 minutes AFTER we finish this page of math. The key is to get them to want to finish their work, in order to move on to the next thing.

You can set bigger goals for the weeks accomplishments. If you finish all your assignments this week, we will have pizza for dinner on Friday. Or something along those lines. Find out what excites them and use it to your advantage.

Get Them Involved

What do they want to learn about? Find out and tailor your lessons around that. Unit studies may be a great approach for the reluctant learner because all the lessons are focused on one topic. I had a friend whose child was fascinated with tornadoes. That is all he wanted to talk about or learn about. So, she did a study on tornadoes, for a MONTH! The science of them, the history of the worst tornadoes, math related to how long they travel, books and spelling lists related to tornadoes, it was a LOT about tornadoes. BUT, he learned, and not reluctantly. Because it was something he was interested in.

Having a reluctant learner can be a challenge, but you can homeschool your child! Find out what interests them, slow down, and get them involved. These tips will help make your days a little smoother.

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a free Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

 

Guide To Attending a Homeschool Expo

Have you stayed away from the Homeschool Expo just because of the magnitude of it all?  Looking at the listing of workshops or a peak into the exhibit hall can give you a deer in the headlights look!  Where do you start?

  • Plan ahead by reading about the available workshops and making a note of when it will be held.  If there are two you want to attend at the same time, consider which would be best to attend and get the other on CD.  If you go with a friend or a spouse, you can each attend one and share notes afterwards.
  • Have a list of curriculum you want to look over.  Plan on taking the time you need and ask the exhibitors your questions.
  • Know your prices.  If you buy at the conference it will save on shipping, but you will want to have some kind of luggage or cart on wheels to save your strength.
  • Do you have a budget?  If you do, don’t spend it all at once!  The school year is long and you will probably need something else before the year is out.

Attending the Homeschool Expo is educational and exciting.  The workshops and exhibitors are there for you.  You might also want to consider Homeschooling for Excellence, a one day conference for beginning homeschoolers.

http://www.southeasthomeschoolexpo.com/homeschooling-101