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Red Rock Traditions

At red rock traditions, our mission is simple….to strengthen the bonds of family relationships through sharing and celebrating traditions. We offer a beautiful line of easy-to-engage products designed to help families create and celebrate traditions.

Learning Wrap-ups

Learning Wrap-ups offers “Hands-on and Self-Correcting” materials for Basic Math and Reading skills. We have been a favorite home school supplier for more than 30 years.

Website: Learning Wrap-ups – www.learningwrapups.com

Tips for Homeschooling Your Special Needs Child

Do you have a special needs child that you are homeschooling? Kudos to you for being dedicated to your child’s education. Homeschooling a special needs child comes with special considerations, but the end rewards will be worth it. If you plan on homeschooling your special needs child, keep these tips in mind.

Homeschooling a special needs child comes with special considerations, but the end rewards will be worth it. If you plan on homeschooling your special needs child, keep these tips in mind.

Find a curriculum you love

Homeschooling your special needs child is going to require a unique approach to curriculum selection. It might require flexibility and extra attention to learning styles. Don’t be afraid to piece together your own selection of resources that work best for your child. Ask for recommendations from other special needs homeschooling parents to see which curriculum has worked for them. If you don’t have support locally, online groups are a good source. A quick search of Facebook groups will probably yield results. Finding a curriculum may take some trial and error, but remember that the freedom to choose what works best is a huge advantage of homeschooling, special needs or not!

Identify what your child’s needs are

When you identify what your child’s needs truly are, you will be able to homeschool more effectively. This goes beyond a medical diagnosis, though that’s definitely a starting point. Identifying (with the help of your doctor or another specialist) what areas they need help in is a good start. For example, if your child has autism, there are several ways you can focus on developing their skills and helping them learn. Special learning needs might also include dyslexia, dysgraphia, or more subtle learning differences that need some extra support and attention. Knowing your child’s unique needs well is key.

Gather up as much patience as you can

Homeschooling a child with a disability is far from easy. There are challenges that most families just won’t understand unless they have experienced it, too. You will need to gather as much support as you can. Find encouragement where you can — from other special needs parents, family members, or online as I mentioned. The more support you have, the easier this journey is going to be. However, even if you don’t have support readily available, you can still do this. Homeschooling and special needs education are becoming more widely known and accepted. There are many books and articles on the topic. Don’t forget to check your local library (you’ll find books and possibly a support group there). If there isn’t a group, consider starting your own by posting flyers at your doctor’s office or local library. Remember that homeschooling is a marathon, not a sprint, so developing patience and perseverance will serve you well.

Trial and error is your best friend

Everyone knows that sometimes homeschooling goes one way, when you expect it to go another. That’s true of most things when parenting, right? When homeschooling a special needs child, you will go through a lot of trial and error. This is okay! Find what works and what does not work.

Homeschooling a child with special needs is a lot of work, but worth it. Whether your child has behavior problems, sensory issues, or is a high needs child—there are ways to make progress academically. Homeschooling is an excellent choice to give them the opportunity to really shine and thrive in an individualized learning environment.

What tips do you have for homeschooling your special needs child?


Sara is a homeschooling mom of three, including one with special needs. She blogs at The Homeschool Post and Embracing Destiny.

Myth Busting Dyslexia

If you or someone you love has the gift of dyslexia, you’re aware that these highly accomplished individuals think, learn and process information differently than non-dyslexics.

So too, did Michael Faraday, Pierre Curie,  Pablo Picasso, General George Patton and many many more in a  diversity of fields.

It’s key, of course, that kids who’ve been diagnosed with dyslexia realize this as they struggle through day to day tasks that those of us non-dyslexics take for granted.

As the Mom of a very bright, articulate, literate, artistic, theatrical kid who thinks sooooo far out of the box,

I have found that many many people are still plagued by myths. And sadly, that there is still an extreme stigma attached to dyslexia. He faces it among his peers and even among family members.

What are some of the signs associated with dyslexia? My son exhibits ( ed) only about half of these as symptoms vary from individual to individual and day to day

  • Trouble learning letters and sounds
  • Difficulty learning to speak
  • Difficulty organizing written and spoken language  (expressive )
  • Trouble memorizing number facts
  • Difficulty reading quickly enough to comprehend
  • Trouble persisting with and comprehending longer reading assignments
  • Difficulty spelling
  • Trouble learning a foreign language

Difficulty with math operationsMany still falsely believe that dyslexics are slow learners or, even worse, are  behavior “problems.”Nothing could be farther from the truth. And in fact, dyslexia affects people of all intellectual backgrounds. AND dyslexic symptoms, though they are very hard to specifically diagnose, are exhibited by 1 in 7 people.

Many still falsely believe that dyslexics are slow learners or, even worse, are  behavior “problems.”Nothing could be farther from the truth. And in fact, dyslexia affects people of all intellectual backgrounds. AND dyslexic symptoms, though they are very hard to specifically diagnose, are exhibited by 1 in 7 people.

Way back when  I was a reading teacher turned classroom teacher for a total of 13 years in city and suburban schools before becoming a  Mommy….turned homeschooler. We’re now in our fourteenth year of home educating our kids with a 16  and a 14-year-old and every day I learn more and more about the learning process. I certainly don’t have all the answers, but through the years I’ve picked up much in the way or research. I’d love to  share with you a little about “What dyslexia is not:”

Many still falsely believe that dyslexics are slow learners or, even worse, are behavior "problems." Here are some myths about dyslexia.

Dyslexia is not the reading and writing of letters backward.

Writing letters backwards is something that many kids do when they’re first learning to write,  whether they have dyslexia or not.  Even among educators–including university faculty, special education teachers, and speech therapists—70 percent believe that reversing the order of letters is a defining feature of dyslexia. Rather, dyslexia is marked by, among other things, difficulties in the processing of written language.

Dyslexia does not occur in any one type of learner, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic background IQ level.

Rather, dyslexic symptoms manifest themselves in all people in every walk of life. In fact, conservative estimates suggest that 5 to 10 % of the entire population may be dyslexic.

Dyslexia is not accompanied by behavioral and attention issues.

Dyslexia is a severe reading problem of neurological origin. There are no physical, medical, or psychological conditions which account for the language processing deficits. Of course, if a dyslexic child is inattentive in class, I maintain that this is due to his inability to focus on the concept being taught due to the limitations placed on him because of the dyslexia. Sort of the chicken or the egg syndrome? However, you might find interesting that dyslexia is a registered disability under the Chronically Sick & Disabled Persons’  Act of 1970, Education Act of 1993 and the Disability Discrimination Act of 1995.

Dyslexia is not a condition which affects “slow learners.”

In fact, dyslexia indications are found within students of average and above average intelligence.

Dyslexia is not caused by “bad” or neglectful parenting.

No indeed…..The  dyslexic person uses his right brain hemisphere instead of his left to process language, thus requiring the use of different neural pathways ( “detours” if you will ) than the non-dyslexic person. Additionally, dyslexia is thought to be genetic and occurring in families.

Dyslexia is not “curable.”

Dyslexia is not a disease. There is no “cure.” However, with appropriate and early diagnosis and suitable remediation, intervention, patience, love, encouragement, support from teachers, family and other individuals in roles of guidance, dyslexics can thrive in school and beyond, even achieving high levels of success.

Don’t forget that fellows such as Pierre Curie, Albert Einstein, Alexander Graham Bell and good ole Tom Jefferson were dyslexics……

I wouldn’t go so far as to say that my son wears his dyslexia as a badge of honor. BUT he is no longer as uncomfortable about it when situations arise and it is apparent to many that he has a language issue. He is in fact, thrilled to be in the company of many accomplished individuals throughout history. He’s also pretty happy to hear that Captain Jack Sparrow ( Johnny Depp) is dyslexic as well. But chagrined to find that his favorite Founding Father, John Adams, by all accounts,  was not. Ah well. Can’t win ’em all.

 

For more info, please consult the International Dyslexia Association (  https://dyslexiaida.org/ )


Author Bio:Chris Capolino

A bit about me?   Wife, mom, writer, teacher, traveler, party giver, encourager.  I’m a freelance writer who contributes  to a variety of digital and print media. And   I love blogging  all things family,  faith, travel,  homeschool, crafts at  my home on the web, Campfires and Cleats

If you’d  like to contact me, you can do that right here~ campfiresandcleats@gmail.com.

 

 

 

How to Teach States and Capitals

I remember learning the states and capitals in school. I think it was around 4th grade? We were given a paper map and expected to fill it in while under a time constraint.

Not exactly fun learning is it?

I knew when it came time to teach my homeschoolers their states and capitals I wanted to do it in a different way. I wanted it to be FUN. Not dry and boring.

Here are ways to make that happen!

When it came time to teach my homeschoolers their states and capitals I wanted it to be FUN. Not dry and boring. Here are some ways I made that happen!

Unit Studies

Pick a state that your child wants to learn about, and create a fun unit study. Check out books from the library on that state. Learn it’s capital, bird, flag, and other features that make it stand out from the others. What are some great geographical locations to visit while there? What makes that state a good tourist attraction? What famous people live there or came from there? You can study one state a week for a full year, or choose one state a day for a month or two.

Repetition

The goal, of course, is to learn the states and capitals. This may require DAILY practice. Once the skill is mastered you will want to continue having your children practice the skill on a weekly basis.

Just like learning the multiplication tables and other skills, repetition is a MUST if you want your children to MASTER the ability to identify all 50 states and capitals.

The key though is making the repetition FUN.

Fun Games and Apps

One way we have made the repetition needed to learn the 50 states and capitals fun is by using computer games and apps.  I am listing some of these resources below. Our children are growing up in a tech-based world. It is no wonder why they will learn their states and capitals better using technology.  For about 15 minutes a day have your kids play one of these games. Keep at it for a few weeks and you will be amazed what they learn with little to no instruction from you.

Hands-on Resources 

In addition to fun games and apps, it is important to have hands-on resources to reinforce the lessons they are learning. You can do this through board games, lego activities, books, maps, puzzles or other resources you can find or create.

Having hands-on resources to help your children learn their states and capitals puts something tangible in front of them.  While technology is a wonderful tool, it doesn’t replace REAL books, maps, or manipulatives.

If you have been wondering HOW to teach the 50 states and capitals I hope this post has given you some great ideas. Our children do not have to learn their states and capitals in the same dry way we did in school. We can make it fun and interactive for them. Kids learn best when the repetition is FUN. Let’s make that happen!

 

Resources that can help:

Computer Games

Apps

Hands on Games and Activities 

Videos

Board Games and Books

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