How Do Homeschoolers Perform Long Term?

How do Homeschoolers perform long term

We already know that homeschool students perform well academically, but how do they do long term? Do they turn in to socially inept adults? Do they thrive at college? How do homeschoolers perform long term?

Do Homeschooled students go to college?

Yes! Over 74% of homeschooled graduates have taken some form of college level courses. Compare that to 46% of the general population.

How do homeschool students perform academically in college?

Compared to conventional students, college students who were homeschooled earn, on average a higher first year GPA (3.41) than the overall average (3.12) a higher fourth year GPA (3.46) than the overall average (3.16) and have a higher college graduation rate (66.7%) compared to the overall average (57.5%).

Once in College, how do homeschooled students do socially?

Recent studies have found that whether or not a student is homeschooled has no affect on their self esteem in college. However, these students do have a significantly lower rate of depression, and tend to rate their college experiences more positively than students who were not homeschooled.

Does the family bonds made by homeschooling last?

Yes! The bonds made with  family members during homeschooling, last a lifetime. Homeschooled children are more likely to adopt the behaviors and values of their family members because they are ones they spend the most time with.

Are Homeschoolers active in their communities after graduation?

Yes! Homeschool graduates tend to participate regularly in community services. They are also 50% more likely to be members of organizations like a church or synagogue.

How do homeschoolers feel about homeschooling once they are adults?

The majority of adults who were homeschooled plan on homeschooling their own children. They also tend to have no negative feelings about their education.

So, if you have been wondering what the long term affects of homeschooling are I hope this has given you some peace about your decision. I have found no long term disadvantages of homeschooling. Homeschooling is a great education choice for many families, and the advantages will always outweigh the doubts you may have!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

 

Extracurricular Activities for Homeschoolers

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One thing I was worried about when I first began homeschooling, was how my kids would make friends. I wasn’t worried about socialization, just what activities would be available to them since they were homeschooled. Within our first year of homeschooling I realized just how little I actually needed to worry ! There are tons of extracurricular activities for homeschoolers, here are just a few.

Scouts
Boy scouts, girl scouts, either one is open to homeschoolers. Some scouting groups are inclusive to a school district, but many will also take homeschooled children also. In order to get information for your homeschooled child contact your local office. You can find an office close to you by looking on their website.

Sports

Many school districts allow homeschoolers to participate in sporting events. Some have a cut off as to age and grade. Check with your local school district for more information. If you do not want to go through a school district check and see if a church near you offers Upward Sports. These are typically Christian based, and not as competitive. They are also open to anyone.

Theatre

If you have a little drama queen don’t despair! Many towns offer children’s theatre programs. These programs are all inclusive and have no district requirements.

Homeschool Groups

Many homeschool groups offer co-ops, field trips, etc. Some larger groups offer sports teams, scouting and more. Check with your homeschool group and see what they offer. If you don’t have a local homeschool group, consider starting one yourself!

Library

Book clubs, arts and crafts, computer classes, and even homeschool story times are available at many local libraries. Many of these activities are after school hours, so they are open to all!

These are just a few of many possible extracurricular activities for homeschoolers. Depending on where you live you may be able to utilize all or some of these options. Larger areas tend to have more opportunities than smaller towns, but as a homeschool mom in a small town myself, I have to say that small towns will still offer many of these extracurricular activities!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a free Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

 

 

 

Top 5 Faith Based Homeschool Curriculums

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Many homeschoolers homeschool for religious reasons, and when bombarded with so many curriculum choices, they may not know which ones to look at. I have homeschooled for a while now, and have tried multiple curriculums. I have shared three of my favorite curriculums before, but want to focus on some of the most popular faith based homeschool curriculums.

These picks are of course partially my personal favorites, but also ones that rate very high in reviews and some that are included on Cathy Duffy’s Top Homeschool Picks.

  1. Apologia Science: We have used and LOVE Apologia Science. This curriculum offers many options for Science all from a creationist point of view. The Zoology series is a favorite of many, as are the notebooks that come in Jr. and Middle levels. Apologia offers courses for children age K-12 and the books can be used with more than one child at once.
  2. Rod and Staff: Written by Mennonites, Rod and Staff offers a comprehensive Christian curriculum at very affordable prices. We use Rod and Staff for Spelling and Grammar and have not been disappointed. They offer options for all subjects from preschool through 8th The books are all black and white, and are not as flashy as some big name homeschool retailers. They make up for that in content and affordability though.
  3. Abeka: Abeka is a top pick for many homeschoolers. We have never used it, but I have not heard anything negative about it. Abeka is very thorough and offers programs from preschool through high school.
  4. Sonlight: This literature-based program is very popular among homeschoolers. Sonlight offers core programs that allow children who are close in age to study together. They focus on high quality literature for most subjects. Some books on Sonlights list are not faith based, but they hold strong on offering them to show children the views of those on the other side of the creation debate. They offer programs for children from Preschool through High School
  5. My Fathers World: Built with a mission focus, My Fathers World is considered a somewhat Charlotte Mason Curriculum. Nature studies are important, as is Bible. Children learn Bible right along with all other subjects as it is engrained throughout the curriculum. This program allows children from age 2nd through 8th grade to work together. They also offer curriculum for younger and older grades.

These are just a few of the many faith based curriculum options out there. For more reviews on curriculum check out Homeschool Reviews, or check out this site that lists top faith based homeschool curriculums by subject.

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

 

Homeschooling a Reluctant Learner

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Do you have a child who just doesn’t like school? Everything seems like a chore when it comes to learning. They don’t want to do math, reading is a bore, and getting them to sit and concentrate is a near impossible task…. If this is your child, you may have a reluctant learner. Most kids are reluctant in school at some point in their education career, but reluctant learners are different. They really don’t seem to like school. At all.  Here are some tips for homeschooling a reluctant learner.

Debunk the Myth

What is the myth? The myth is that your child doesn’t want to learn. That is not true. All children WANT to learn. Whether it be how to play the new minecraft game, or how to climb the tree they are gazing at out the window. The key is to find out what it is that they WANT to learn.

Slow Down

Don’t push. Really. Who says a child HAS to read at five? If reading is hard, slow down, and pick it up in a few months. Forcing a child to learn something they are not ready for can cause emotional stress on the child, and exasperation for you. Let them work at their own pace. That is the beauty of homeschooling.

Set Goals

What does your child like? Figure that out and set a goal. You can have X for 10 minutes AFTER we finish this page of math. The key is to get them to want to finish their work, in order to move on to the next thing.

You can set bigger goals for the weeks accomplishments. If you finish all your assignments this week, we will have pizza for dinner on Friday. Or something along those lines. Find out what excites them and use it to your advantage.

Get Them Involved

What do they want to learn about? Find out and tailor your lessons around that. Unit studies may be a great approach for the reluctant learner because all the lessons are focused on one topic. I had a friend whose child was fascinated with tornadoes. That is all he wanted to talk about or learn about. So, she did a study on tornadoes, for a MONTH! The science of them, the history of the worst tornadoes, math related to how long they travel, books and spelling lists related to tornadoes, it was a LOT about tornadoes. BUT, he learned, and not reluctantly. Because it was something he was interested in.

Having a reluctant learner can be a challenge, but you can homeschool your child! Find out what interests them, slow down, and get them involved. These tips will help make your days a little smoother.

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a free Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

 

A Look at Homeschool Socialization

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One of the biggest questions homeschool parents get is “What about socialization?”. We’ve discussed here before about what socialization is, and how homeschoolers can make sure their children are socialized. So, today I am going to share some of the social advantages homeschoolers have, and how the statistics say homeschoolers perform socially.

HSLDA conducted a survey in 2003 of over 7,000 adults who were homeschooled. The surveys goal was to show that homeschoolers “grow up” better off than their public schooled peers, and that in fact they are well-socialized adults capable of handling society, and their peers. What they found was very interesting!

  • Homeschool graduates are active and involved in their communities. Those who participated in community services were 71% of homeschooled adults compared to 37% of non-homeschooled adults. Eighty eight percent of homeschooled adults were members of organizations like a church, professional group, etc compared to 50% of U.S. adults.
  • Contentment makes a big difference in our lives as adults right? Homeschooled adults are happier with their lives, compared to adults who were not homeschooled (59% vs. 39%).
  • Out of all the homeschooled adults, polled 95% say that they were glad they were homeschooled and 82% say that they plan on homeschooling their children.

In addition to the above facts, there are many more awesome social benefits to being homeschooled. One study conducted by the Seattle-based Discovery Institute found that homeschooled children tend to demonstrate fewer behavioral problems than their peers do. This result was found after counselors observed a group of children playing; they did not know which were homeschooled, and which were not. The results, iNational Home Education Research Institute president Brian Ray, believes are based in part due to who the main role models are in a homeschoolers life:

 “Public school children have, as their main role models, peers, while homeschool students have as their role models, adults,” he explains.

The study also found that homeschoolers tend to be less apt to follow along with negative influences.  Jeffrey Koonce, a school superintendent in Miller County, Missouri, has studied homeschool students as some transition into public schools. He has found that in most cases, homeschoolers are “socially adept” and mature than their peers. This could be because homeschoolers are around a wide range of ages, including adults, rather than being in a school with students all the same age on a regular basis.

If you have been concerned over how your homeschooled child may fare socially, I hope this has put your mind at rest. Homeschooling offers many advantages; social skills are just one of them!

Misty Bailey is a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.