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Celebrate Strengths

With “Try On Jobs,” students will no longer waste time or money on BIG DECISION mistakes. The 25-minute online experience, grounded in research, measures individual hard-wired strengths that connect to critical factors in 400+ jobs–that students can “try on” digitally.

Ryan Weston

Ryan is the Director of The Highlands Latin Association of Schools in Louisville Kentucky. He works with homeschooling families to establish and grow Cottage School programs in their area. Ryan holds a Bachelors of Science in Business Administration and is currently pursuing a Masters of Divinity at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He and his wife, Nikky, homeschool their five children in Louisville.

Homeschool Scholarships 101

Years ago homeschooling parents second guessed their decision to homeschool with the age-old question, “Will they ever get into college?”.Luckily, we no longer have to worry as much about that as more and more colleges are recruiting homeschoolers. For the most part, the days of discrimination from admission boards are gone, and we know our children CAN get into a good college.

However, one question stays the same. How are we going to pay for it?

Homeschool scholarships, how do get them? Find them? Keep them? With more and more information out there regarding how well homeschoolers perform long term the scholarship process for homeschoolers should not be any more difficult than those who are traditionally educated.

How Can I Obtain a Homeschool Scholarship?

Most scholarships don’t exclude homeschoolers, and in fact, more and more are actually targeting them. Due to the widely publicized studies revealing that homeschoolers have consistently scored higher on college entrance exams than their public school counterparts, in recent years, homeschool applicants make widely sought after applicants.

In order to obtain a homeschool scholarship, a homeschool student must follow the same path as other students when applying. Typically this includes taking the SAT/ACT your junior year of college as well as being involved in your community and in extracurricular activities.

What Can I Expect from Homeschool Scholarships?

Scholarships can be one-time awards or last all four years of college. They come in different sizes and can start at $50 and go all the up to a full ride.

College scholarships are awarded on the basis of many different things.

  • Good grades
  • High Sat/ACT scores
  • Special skills or talents
  • Pursuing a specific career
  • Activity in certain groups or organizations

Where Can I Find Homeschool Scholarships?

So, now the big question, where do you actually find a homeschool scholarship? The answer is really anywhere. Scholarships can be found in numerous locations from your employer to your church, to your curriculum company. Let’s take a look at a few specific homeschool scholarship opportunities.

State Scholarships for Home Schooled Candidates

Each individual state typically offers scholarships and financial assistance to college-bound individuals.  Some state-specific resources are applied generally, to benefit the greatest numbers of applicants, but there are also initiatives on the books for particular student groups.  While state scholarships might not be specific to homeschoolers, they usually don’t specifically exclude them from participating either.

Home School Legal Defense Association

HSLDA is an advocacy organization for homeschoolers.  The Association maintains this listing of financial aid opportunities for home schooled students of higher education

Sonlight Scholarship

Users of the Sonlight curriculum may qualify for a scholarship. They’re awarded based on two sets of criteria. The “Green Criteria” include creativity and acts of kindness. Academics are given the greatest weight among awards based on “Blue Criteria.”

Home Education Recognition Organization

HERO sponsors three scholarships specifically for students completing a home-schooling program. The Craig Dickinson Memorial Scholarship is awarded in recognition of outstanding academic achievement. The Mason Lighthouse Scholarship is for service-minded students who have contributed to their church or civic community. The State of the Arts Scholarship is for students who plans to study performing or visual arts. Each HERO scholarship is $1000

Apologia National Scholarship for Christian Service

The  Apologia National Scholarship for Christian Service is granted for $2,000 to home-educated students across the United States who are interested in joining the one-year Christian gap year program at Impact360. Applicants who have been educated with the Apologia curriculum will be given preference.

Additional Information about Homeschool Scholarships

 

With more and more information out there regarding how well homeschoolers perform long term, the scholarship process for homeschoolers should not be any more difficult than those who are traditionally educated. If anything you may be surprised to find that there are MORE opportunities out there. So, don’t be discouraged about planning for your child’s college education.

When the Curriculum Isn’t Working

Most of us have been in the books again for a few weeks.  For some, the homeschool year has started out great. Kids like what they are learning, and it has been smooth sailing. For others, it may be going rough. Kids hate the curriculum, mom hates the curriculum, and no one is learning anything. So, what do you do when the curriculum isn’t working?

Have you ever realized that the curriculum isn't working? When this happens what do you do? We are going to look at a few things to do when the curriculum isn't working.

Step Back

Take a step back and think “why?”. Is it advanced? Not challenging enough? Not geared towards the way your child learns? You may be able to figure out why it isn’t working when you step back and look at it from your child’s eyes.

Take a Break

Yes, I know the school year just started, but if it’s not working, then no one is learning anyway. Stop; take a break from the curriculum for a little bit and refresh. Taking a few days off will not make or break your school year, but it may be enough to refresh you and your children’s attitudes.

Evaluate

Think about what you liked, and didn’t like from the curriculum. Make a list. Keep these things in mind when you go to look for something else. Find out what your teaching style and your children’s learning styles are. Evaluating your current homeschool curriculum and how your children learn will save you time and money on future homeschool curriculum purchases.

Ditch it!

If it’s not working, there is no way to keep using it. You can shelve it for a different child, or sell it to purchase something else. The key is to remember what is best for your child, and that may not be the curriculum you are using. Ditching it will save you a lot of time and heartache in the end.

Curriculum can be one of the hardest purchases homeschool parents make. But, if something is not working, you will only stress yourself, and your child out by continuing to use it anyway.  If you don’t have the funds to purchase something different then check out some of the free curriculums out there for this subject. You could also look into using Unit Studies you make up yourself from the library.

When the curriculum isn’t working, don’t stress. Don’t make homeschooling a nightmare by forcing yourself to use something that may not fit you and your child. Just step back, take a break, evaluate what you’ve learned, and ditch it for something else. You will save you and your child a lot of heartaches!


Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a free Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey. You can also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

What Your Child Gains from Homeschooling

When you first tell people you are homeschooling you are likely to get a ton of feedback about the things they are missing out on. However, what people tend to not talk about are the things a child gains from homeschooling.

There are many advantages to homeschooling But people tend to not talk about the things a child gains from homeschooling.

One on One Education

Homeschooling allows a child to have their education tailored to them. It provides a child with an awesome student to teacher ratio, and gives the child the opportunity to advance, or slow down to whatever level the need.  Some children may have special needs that are not being met in a public school classroom. Homeschooling allows them the luxury of a more one on one education that better suits their needs. Some children may struggle with math, but excel in the area of English. These students can work ahead in one subject, and at their own pace in the others.

Safety

Homeschooling allows a child to work and learn in a safe environment free from bullies, allergies (if the child has them), communicable diseases, and other things a child may be exposed to in public school.  Yes, bullies and the other things listed appear in everyday life, but homeschooling allows a child to experience them with the help of a parent, and in the case of communicable diseases not nearly as often as if they were in a classroom full of kids who come to school sick, so the parents can go to work.

Freedom

Homeschooling allows a child the freedom to work at their own pace, learn from hands on opportunities, and allows flexibility to make your own schedule. I know many homeschooled teens that have jobs during the day, since their school is normally done shortly after lunch. Families can travel year round, since they are not tied down to a school calendar. Learning can happen in a museum, zoo, car, or doctor’s office. When a child is homeschooled the world is their classroom.

There are many advantages to homeschooling, and the advantages for a child are far and wide. A child gains from homeschooling the freedom to learn at their own pace, the luxury of a one on one education and the added safety net of learning in an at home environment.


Misty Bailey is a Christian wife and homeschool mom. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

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