Carpets for Kids

carpetsforkids

Welcome to Carpets for Kids! We are the leading children’s carpet manufacturer specializing in high quality educational rugs. At Carpets for Kids, our goal is to provide teachers, librarians, parents and pastors with colorful, patterned theme area rugs to enhance learning for young children. We offer a wide selection of eco-friendly, recyclable educational carpets and interactive play rugs. Explore our selection of children’s learning carpets to find the perfect play rug for your classroom, library or ministry.

When You Feel Like a Homeschool Failure

When You Feel Like a Homeschool Failure

Homeschool parents have one of the hardest yet most rewarding jobs out there. We have the awesome job of caring for our children on a daily basis. Yet, we also have to play the roles of teacher, nurse, housekeeper, cook and many more. Often times we will go to bed at the end of the day exhausted, and feel like a homeschool failure.

You may think to yourself that you yelled too many times, there are dishes still in the sink, clothes still needing folded, and papers that still need graded. Yet, chances are you didn’t fail your children.

  • Think of everything you did accomplish that day. Did you read to your kids? Feed them? Play a game? Take them outside? Talk to them? Chances are you did at least a few of these things. You are not a failure!
  • Take a deep breath and revaluate. What makes you feel like a failure? Now, find a way to fix it. Sometimes it can be as simple as getting up a little earlier, or delegating a responsibility to an older child.
  • Lower your expectations. What season of life are you in? Depending on the season you are in you may need to lower your expectations. There are only so many hours in a day and sometimes things need to be put on the back burner. Freezer meals are not the end of the world, and it is not going to hurt anything for the towels to stay in a basket an extra day.
  • Give yourself grace. As parents we are not perfect. If you feel like a failure for things that maybe were within your control, give yourself grace. Wake up the next day with a smile on your face and a resolve to not make the same mistakes again. Parents have the awesome luxury of getting to repeat their job each day. So, we can learn from our mistakes and move on.

Homeschool parents, you wear many hats and it is natural to feel like you failed at a few of them. But, remember the ones you didn’t fail at! Focus on those, then revaluate your expectations and give yourself grace. You are not a failure!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

Five Ways a Homeschool Mom Can Make Money from Home

Homeschool mom can make money at home

As a homeschool family living on one income can be difficult. It can be done, we are usually used to pinching pennies, and making things last. However, it is also nice when we can contribute financially to our household. I have worked from home for over 8 years. I cut back a lot after we began homeschooling, but I do contribute to our family’s income, and if you want, you can too! Here are five ways that a homeschool mom can make money from home.

Money Saving Apps and Websites- There are numerous apps out there that can help you make money doing things you do anyway, like grocery shop! One app that is nice is Ibotta. Anytime you go to the grocery store, movie theatre, or a restaurant check and see if your purchase is eligible for a rebate. If so, claim it and you’re done! The cash out is low at $5. I typically make around $15 a month just by going to the grocery store. It’s not a lot, but if you add it up over a year it could be a nice way to purchase a Christmas present, or help with curriculum. Swagbucks has many different options to help you earn points. You can take surveys, shop online, print coupons, and watch videos.  You then can cash your points out for gift cards to places like Wal-Mart and Amazon. I have used them before, and could earn $5 or so a month if I remember to use them.

In Home Child Care- I ran an in-home daycare for 7 years. It was chaotic but a lot of fun! The kids liked having friends over all the time, and it brings in a good amount of money. Check with your local job and family services for licensing information.

Freelancing-This is what I do now, and I love it! Good places to get started freelancing are Odesk and Elance. If you enjoy writing it is a great job to get into. The hours are flexible, and the pay isn’t bad.

Virtual Assistant– I have done this before, and it is not bad. You work behind the “scenes” for bloggers, authors, or curriculum companies. It is somewhat difficult to find VA jobs, but you can find some on Odesk, or by following blogs like Money Saving Mom. VA’s are responsible for sending and responding to emails, scheduling blog posts, customer service work and anything else their client may want them to do.

Selling Homemade Items-If you are crafty, can sew, or are great at making stuff look into selling your items. Websites like Etsy are taking off like crazy! Moms can list their items for sale and make a good profit. I have friends who crochet hats and scarves and sell them on Facebook at Christmas, I also have friends who paint signs, or make crafts, then sell them at flea markets. There are really no limits to how you can sell your items. You just need to be a little creative (which I’m not, so I haven’t tried this one). However, I promise it works if you are!

These are just a few ways that homeschool moms can help contribute to their family’s income. I hope that one of them can work for you!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

Tips for Homeschooling Your ADHD Child

Tips for Homeschooling your ADHD child

Homeschooling provides parents with a chance to cater to their child’s learning abilities. It provides students a chance to learn at their own pace, and not be tied up in a classroom for a full day. Homeschooling provides those students who have difficulty in classroom settings to thrive. This is the case for the ADHD child.

Children with ADHD tend to be fidgety, lack attention, and may have trouble comprehending what is being said in a typical classroom. They are wired differently, and being in one room or required to sit still all day does not play to their learning abilities at all.

Children with ADHD do best when allowed to learn in an environment that caters to their needs and provides a one on one education. Children with ADHD tend to thrive in a homeschool environment.

Here are some tips that can help as you begin homeschooling your ADHD child:

Break up the tasks into smaller increments. This allows the material to be more manageable for your child. At the beginning of day you can give your child a checklist of what you will be covering that day. This allows them to focus more clearly because they are able to see what is coming next.

Minimize distractions. Find a quiet place for your child to learn. Make sure there is nothing distracting like lights that are flickering, or a desk full of items unrelatable to the task at hand. Children with ADHD need their work areas to be clear and organized, this helps them focus and stay on task.

Be creative. If the weather is nice, take a lesson outdoors. If this is not an option incorporate hands on activities into your lessons. Children with ADHD tend to be more kinesthetic learners. They benefit greatly from short lessons that allow them to use their bodies as well as their minds.

If you have an artistic child, allow them to draw while you are teaching. To you this may be distracting, but to them it helps them focus. It allows them a way to utilize their energy.

Another option is to let them respond to questions orally instead of on paper. Many children with ADHD find writing a challenge, and oral answers allow them to expedite the learning process. Even if a child with ADHD knows an answer, it is difficult for them to transfer that answer to paper.

Be patient. If your child asks you numerous questions or the same question many times, don’t assume they are not paying attention. Chances are they are trying to comprehend what you said and they really may not remember. Asking again helps them to hear the material a second time, giving them another chance to remember what you said.

Deciding to homeschool your ADHD child may have you feeling overwhelmed, but believe me you can do it! Hopefully these tips can help!

Misty Bailey is a Christian wife and homeschool mom. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

 

Dr. Libby Hodge

Libby Hodge

Dr. Libby Hodge is a Licensed Pastoral Counselor and Certified Life Coach. She holds her Doctorate of Pastoral Counseling from Chesapeake Bible College and Seminary. Dr Libby is a Licensed Facilitator for Identity and Destiny and is certified through the American Association of Christian Counselors for Pastoral Counseling. She serves as Children’s Ministry Director for Connection Church in Hinesville, GA.