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SumBlox

SumBlox are wooden number shaped building blocks that show value and symbol.

Elemental Science

At , we provide people just like you the easy-to-use science plans that you have been looking for! Our mission is to help educators around the globe share about the wonders of science with their students. We offer easy-to-use homeschool science plans written by an author with a strong background in science and teaching. We can help you teach science at home or in school with our lapbooks, living books, full science curricula, and teacher resources.

Ray Simmons

Ray Simmons and Cynthia homeschooled their five children together. He severs as elder and Bible teacher at Grace Community Church. He’s also an accountant and has successfully managed money for thirty years.

Fun and Easy Ways to Teach Literacy Skills

Your child may not learn to read till they are around age 5, but your child is learning from the time they are born. The foundation of good literacy skills is started while the child is still young. Early literacy skills are things like communication, recognition of letters, numbers and words (not reading, but recognizing), storytelling, being able to narrate what was said, or read, learning to rhyme, and recognize sounds.

Here are some simple things you can do to teach literacy skills:

Read to your child!

Start at a young age, even infants and toddlers can learn to love books. When your child is around 3 or 4 start reading good quality literature to them. Some good ones to start with are Charlotte’s Web, Stuart Little, or the Little House Series. Reading is such an important tool in a child’s life and can open up a whole new world to a young child. Studies have shown that exposing children to reading before preschool greatly improves their academic performance when they start elementary school.

Give them books-lots of them!

Don’t feel obligated to buy them though, get in the habit of taking your kids to the library every week (or at least once a month)  and checking out great books for kids. When they are young they may just look at the pictures. They may hold them upside down, or even teeth on them. This is okay; the point is getting them in their hands while they are little.

Talk to your child about letters and words they see every day.

There are letters and words on road signs, store signs, labels on foods, cover pages on books and magazines. Point out the letters and words to your child. Look at the EXIT and STOP signs and explain what they mean and how the letters come together to make an important word.

Here are some simple things you can do to teach literacy skills. Early literacy skills are things like communication, recognition of letters, numbers and words, storytelling, being able to narrate what was said, or read,

Make a game out of rhyming words.

Say funny phrases like “The man has a fan and a tan” or “The fat cat sat on the hat”. Point out the words that rhyme in the phrase, and see if they can come up with one of their own.

Use claps, jumps or pats to teach syllables.

Start with your child’s name. For example “Alyson” has 3 syllables so we would jump 3 times (AL-Y-SON). Then you could move on to your name, the dog’s name, what you are eating for dinner, etc.

Teach through play!

When teaching them to write their name or learning the alphabet, use a stick and let them play in the dirt! What kid doesn’t love to play outside? This is a simple way to get them learning while they are up and moving.

All of these skills can be taught at home with little or no money spent on “curriculum” or “early learning tools”. Learning through play is important for young children and these are just a few tips you can use to teach literacy skills and help your child learn.


Author Bio: Misty Bailey and her husband have been married for over a decade and have three beautiful children. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

College Application Process for Homeschoolers

You made it through your hardest homeschooling years, High School! And now, you are on to the next step, applying for college! I am sure you and your graduate are excited and overwhelmed. The college application process can be grueling, but one good thing is that the college application process for homeschoolers is really not that more difficult than a traditional highschooler.

The college application process can be grueling, but one good thing is that the college application process for homeschoolers is really not that more difficult than a traditional highschooler.

Visit Colleges

During your child’s sophomore and junior year of high school, they should visit prospective universities. Make a list of the top 5-10 colleges your child may want to attend, and schedule campus visits.

Take Exams

The SAT should be taken in December of your student’s junior year. They can begin studying in the fall. They can then retake the test in May if they desire.

The ACT should be taken in December of your student’s junior year as well. Then the retest would be in April if your student desires.

Universities typically have a cutoff date for test scores of December in a student’s senior year, so it is imperative that your child takes the necessary tests before that date. If you want more information on preparing your homeschool child for these tests we have you covered! 

FAFSA

FAFSA is necessary for all students to complete. This will give you an idea of what types of financial aid your child is eligible for and will help you make a plan to pay for your child’s college.

The deadlines for the FAFSA will vary from state to state, and from college to college. For more information regarding FAFSA deadlines check out their website. The general rule of thumb is early spring, but one can apply as early as January the fall before they plan to begin college.

Apply

September of a student’s senior year they should make a list of where they are interested in attending. Then second visits can be made if necessary. College applications can be sent as early as October of one’s senior year of high school.

This site has a great timeline to help with the application process.

Things to keep in mind

  • References- A homeschooled student will still need references, but won’t have teachers or guidance counselors to write them. Volunteer coordinators, pastors, co-op teachers, 4-h advisors, bosses from their job, could all be references for a homeschool student.
  • Transcripts- A homeschooled student’s transcript will need to be top notch! If you feel inadequate writing your child’s transcript seek help, from a friend, local organization, or online company.

Homeschooling has become more and more popular, so of course universities are growing more accustomed to homeschool applicants. Don’t stress about the college application process, and remember that your child’s homeschool experience does not put them at a disadvantage, but at an advantage! Any university would be lucky to have him.

HSLDA has a great resource list to help parents in the college application process.

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