Category Archives: Homeschooling Help

3 Tips to Teaching a Child to Read

Here are some tips for teaching a child to read. #3 is great!

Years ago when I was longing to be a teacher, my desired grade was 1st. Why? Because at the time this is the grade when teachers taught their students to read. I LOVED reading, and volunteered throughout Jr. High, High School and College in the reading lab.

When I first began homeschooling I started out with an eager 5 year old who was longing to read. We purchased the curriculum and got to work. To my surprise it wasn’t as easy as I thought it’d be! Fast forward 6 years and I am working on my 5th reader (2 of my own, 3 extras). I have learned a few things about what works, and what doesn’t. Here are three tips to teaching a child to read.

Immerse them in Books

From the womb we have read to our children. As infants we offered sensory books, as toddlers we offered board books, and at preschool age we began reading good quality literature. We have immersed our kids in books at a young age, and so far it has paid off!

Kids LOVE books! IF they are offered to them. In order to create a reader you have to encourage a love of reading in your kids. Reading often will give your children the longing to learn to read themselves. It will create in them a love of reading that will last a lifetime.

Be Patient

I am not the most patient person, and sadly that shows in our beloved phonics curriculum. In the first book there are pencil marks where I circled words over and over again that my daughter missed. I remember those moments; I remember the tears and the frustration (from both of us). And, I have left the pencil marks there. Why? As a reminder that patience pays off. The second book has little to no pencil marks in it, and you know what? She breezed through that book.

Patience is SO important when it comes to teaching a child to read. Patience builds confidence; and confidence is a skill that is required for learning to read. If a child does not feel confident in their own abilities they will not offer their best work. So, be patient!

Be an Example

This goes along to an extent with being patient. Modeling patience will encourage our children to be patient while they are learning. BUT, we should also model a love of reading. Let your children see you read, take them to the library, let them see you checking out books, let them see that reading is something fun to do. By being an example, you will encourage your child in their own reading endeavors.

These are just a few tips that can help when teaching a child to read. Come back next week as we take a look at some of the best reading curriculums!

Misty Bailey is a work at home homeschool mom.  She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.




5 Things to Consider Before Homeschooling

Things to consider before homeschooling


Now is the time of year when public schools have been in session for awhile. Homework is starting to come home with the kids, and the excitement of the new year is wearing down. Where I live there have also been major events happening within the local public schools. Cases like transgender students, bullying, school violence, and other occurrences often make parents second guess there choice of public schools.

Homeschooling is a wonderful thing, and one that has been a huge blessing for our family. Yet, it’s not a decision to be taken lightly. When parents come to me after the situations above and ask me about homeschooling I encourage them to consider a few things before jumping ship.

  1. Feelings- Are you considering homeschooling because you’re emotional? Oftentimes anger can get the best of us. If you are considering homeschooling because you are angry with the public school, I recommend you give it more time. The situation may calm down, or you may find another solution.
  2. Time-Many parents do not realize the massive amount of time homeschooling takes. Parents who are already maxed out time wise may not be in the best situation to homeschool their children. The first few weeks’ school may take upwards of 5 hours a day. Maybe longer depending on how well your children cooperate. Before homeschooling, I recommend checking your schedule, eliminating things if need be, and clearing out the time to homeschool.
  3. Children’s Opinion-Do your children want to be homeschooled? If not, then you may be in a hard spot before even beginning. I am a firm believer that parents make the choices, but our children’s opinions should be taken into consideration. Talk to your children about why you are considering homeschooling. Explain how things will go, and why you think this is the best choice. If they are still against it, I recommend a trial period. Let them know you will try it out for a set amount of time, and then revaluate how homeschooling is going.
  4. Commitment-Homeschooling requires a commitment from at least one parent. A commitment to your child’s education is not one to be taken lightly. Be sure you are willing to take on the responsibility before homeschooling.
  5. Money-Curriculum costs money, if a parent works outside the home, they may need to cut back, having kids home more will mean more resources like food, electric, and water. Field trips and co-op classes may cost, and school supplies will also need to be purchased.

Homeschooling is a big decision, and one that should not be taken lightly. Homeschooling requires time, money, and commitment; these are all things that people may not consider before considering homeschooling.

If you have went through the above scenarios and still feel led to homeschool then great! We have tons of resources here that can be of great value to you. Homeschooling is a decision that when made thoughtfully, is often times not regretted!

Misty Bailey is a work at home homeschool mom.  She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

Why Homeschool Moms Don’t Need to Know Everything

Homeschool Moms Don't Need to Know Everything

There’s a common misconception in the parenting community that homeschool moms need to know everything before they can homeschool their children. Questions we are asked include how we teach geometry or what do you know about anatomy? The truth of the matter is homeschool moms don’t need to know everything. There are many such successful homeschool families out there that contain parents that have no more than a high school diploma.

How? We’re going to look at four reasons why homeschool moms don’t need to know everything.

Teacher’s Manuals

One huge benefit of a homeschool curriculum is the teacher’s manual. Manuals contain step by step instructions on how to teach the subject, answers to the problems, and tips to help homeschool moms get the lesson across to their students.


Don’t know how to teach a certain subject? No worries! Tutors are available for homeschool students just like they are for public school students. Homeschool moms can find tutors through their local school district, through other homeschool moms and even online through companies like and

Co-Op Classes

One thing that my children and I have enjoyed is co-op classes. When Art got the best of me (I am NOT a fun, messy mom) I was relieved to find that it would be covered in co-op classes. Cooking, chemistry, business and other classes are all examples of what a homeschool family can gain from co-op classes. This eliminates homeschool moms from needing to teach these subjects.

The Internet

The internet is full of resources for homeschool moms to utilize with their children. You tube contains documentaries, science experiments, explanatory videos and much more. Online sites like Khan Academy can help homeschool moms get math points across that a child may be struggling with and offers extra math practice as well.

Homeschool moms don’t need to know everything, subjects we aren’t sure how to teach can be taught with tutors or co-op classes. The internet offers resources out there that can help us and our children, and teacher’s manuals are a homeschool mom’s best friend.

If you are considering homeschooling, but not sure if you can because you don’t “know” everything, I encourage you that you CAN do it!

Misty Bailey is a Christian wife and work at home homeschool mom. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

Homeschooling your Dyslexic Child

Homeschooling your dyslexic child

As a parent interested in homeschooling, you may wonder IF you can homeschool your child with dyslexia. The truth is, you can!

Benefits to Homeschooling a Child with Dyslexia

Believe it or not, there are many benefits to homeschooling a child with dyslexia.

  • Homeschooling allows for individualized education in all areas where dyslexic children struggle, including: reading, spelling, composition and comprehension.
  • Homeschooling your dyslexic child allows them to focus on areas of interest, and allows you to plan lessons around those interests.
  • Homeschooling your dyslexic child allows them to NOT be measured day in and day out by their peers.
  • Dyslexic children are allowed to work at their own pace using resources that work best with their individual strengths.
  • Homeschooling your dyslexic child allows them to avoid standardized testing and strict scheduling that takes place in public schools.

Tips to Help Homeschool Your Dyslexic Child

  • Audio Books- These are a great way for dyslexic children to experience books that may have otherwise been too difficult for them to read themselves. Many libraries offer a great selection of audio books!
  • Videos- Dyslexic children who may struggle with textbooks could greatly benefit from video instruction. Consider letting them watch lectures, demonstrations, documentaries, and science experiments. This gives visual learners a better learning experience.
  • Provide Modifications- Allow your dyslexic child modifications. These can include reading directions, allowing more time on tests, explanations when directions are unclear, and whatever other modifications your child may need.

Homeschooling your dyslexic child with these tips are not “cheating” but are ways to allow your child to excel in learning. A dyslexic child has learning differences that could hold them back in a traditional school setting. Homeschooling your dyslexic child and allowing them to work around their areas of struggle is a huge benefit of homeschooling.

Curriculum Options to Consider

There are certain types of curriculum that a dyslexic child may do better with. These include curriculums with:

  • Shorter teaching sessions
  • Auditory learning through DVD’s, audio books, etc.
  • An option for completing work orally

Dyslexic children tend to not do well with curriculums that have:

  • Lots of writing
  • Curriculums that require lots of reading
  • Difficult spelling lists

If you are considering homeschooling your dyslexic child please know that you CAN do it! Take into consideration their learning style, make modifications, and consider curriculums that are better geared for a dyslexic child. With these tips you can homeschool your child with dyslexia!

Author Bio: Misty Bailey and her husband have been married for over a decade and have three beautiful children. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

25 Great Books for Middle Schoolers

Homeschool methods

With summer here, and summer reading programs in full swing, it is a great time to make a book list for your middle school child.

These book series are great for those kids who are in the middle age range (10-12). Use discretion when choosing books for your child, each family will have different values and standards for their child’s literature choices.

Here are 25 great books for middle schoolers:

  1. The Bronze Bow byElizabeth George Speare
  2. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  3. Shilohby Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  4. Esperanza Risingby Pam Muñoz Ryan
  5. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume
  6. Love, Ruby Lavenderby Deborah Wiles
  7. Maggie’s Doorby Patricia Reilly Giff
  8. The Secret Series by Pseudonymous Bosch
  9. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart
  10. The Three Doors Trilogy by Emily Rodda
  11. Pippi Longstocking by byAstrid Lindgren
  12. All of a Kind Family bySydney Taylor
  13. Owls in the Family byFarley Mowat
  14. Sarah Plain and Tall byPatricia MacLachlan
  15. Homer Price byRobert McCloskey
  16. Misty of Chincoteague byMarguerite Henry
  17. Armadillo Tattletale byHelen Ketteman
  18. Cheaper by the Dozen byFrank B. Gilbreth
  19. Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  20. Nancy Drew Mysteries byCarolyn Keene
  21. Hardy Boys Mysteries byFranklin Dixon
  22. How to Train Your Dragon Series byCressida Cowell
  23. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  24. A Series of Unfortunate Events Series byLemony Snicket
  25. The Adventures of Tintin byHergé


Author: Misty Bailey Misty and her husband have been married for over a decade and have three beautiful children. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.