Tag Archives: homeschooling

Homeschooling and Grade Placement

Grade placement in homeschool

I recently shared a shocking homeschool confession post on my blog. In that post, I also shared that I don’t worry about what the grade number is on the front of my children’s books. One of the luxuries of homeschooling is that we don’t have to work on grade level. We can let our kids work at their own pace. This is a luxury for them, and us.

When you first begin homeschooling, you may assume that you can go with whatever grade they “should” be in. But, that is not always the case. I have found that some homeschool curriculums work about a ½-grade level above where our local public schools work. Some curriculum companies work below where our local schools are. You cannot trust the number on the front of a homeschool curriculum and assume it is “grade level appropriate”.

When thinking about where to place your child there are numerous things you can do to properly place them into a curriculum. Check the publishing company’s website and see if they offer grade placement tests. These tests are usually free and can be downloaded onto your computer and printed out. They will likely tell you about where your child should be placed in the publisher’s curriculum.

Another thing you may want to do is see the curriculum in person. This can be done at a convention, through a local homeschool friend who may use the curriculum, or at a curriculum swap and sell. This helps a lot because there may b some material in a curriculum your child has covered, and some they haven’t.

As homeschoolers, we can let our children work at their own pace. They don’t have to worry about what the number on the front of the book says as long as they are mastering the material along the way. Some people do consider grade levels important and where we live we do have to share what grade level our children are in when we turn in our notification. In this case I would consider what grade they WOULD be in if they attended public school. If someone asks my children, what grade they are in they will tell them. This helps in Sunday school classes, Jr church programs, scouts, and sports. Grade levels are not bad; they just aren’t always necessary or accurate when it comes to actual curriculum.

So, when thinking about grade placement for your homeschool child, for record keeping purposes, go with the grade they would be in if they attended public school. For curriculum purposes go with where they place academically and don’t worry about the number on the front of the book! Let them work at their own pace, regardless of what “grade” that may be!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

When You Feel Like a Homeschool Failure

When You Feel Like a Homeschool Failure

Homeschool parents have one of the hardest yet most rewarding jobs out there. We have the awesome job of caring for our children on a daily basis. Yet, we also have to play the roles of teacher, nurse, housekeeper, cook and many more. Often times we will go to bed at the end of the day exhausted, and feel like a homeschool failure.

You may think to yourself that you yelled too many times, there are dishes still in the sink, clothes still needing folded, and papers that still need graded. Yet, chances are you didn’t fail your children.

  • Think of everything you did accomplish that day. Did you read to your kids? Feed them? Play a game? Take them outside? Talk to them? Chances are you did at least a few of these things. You are not a failure!
  • Take a deep breath and revaluate. What makes you feel like a failure? Now, find a way to fix it. Sometimes it can be as simple as getting up a little earlier, or delegating a responsibility to an older child.
  • Lower your expectations. What season of life are you in? Depending on the season you are in you may need to lower your expectations. There are only so many hours in a day and sometimes things need to be put on the back burner. Freezer meals are not the end of the world, and it is not going to hurt anything for the towels to stay in a basket an extra day.
  • Give yourself grace. As parents we are not perfect. If you feel like a failure for things that maybe were within your control, give yourself grace. Wake up the next day with a smile on your face and a resolve to not make the same mistakes again. Parents have the awesome luxury of getting to repeat their job each day. So, we can learn from our mistakes and move on.

Homeschool parents, you wear many hats and it is natural to feel like you failed at a few of them. But, remember the ones you didn’t fail at! Focus on those, then revaluate your expectations and give yourself grace. You are not a failure!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

Five Ways a Homeschool Mom Can Make Money from Home

Homeschool mom can make money at home

As a homeschool family living on one income can be difficult. It can be done, we are usually used to pinching pennies, and making things last. However, it is also nice when we can contribute financially to our household. I have worked from home for over 8 years. I cut back a lot after we began homeschooling, but I do contribute to our family’s income, and if you want, you can too! Here are five ways that a homeschool mom can make money from home.

Money Saving Apps and Websites- There are numerous apps out there that can help you make money doing things you do anyway, like grocery shop! One app that is nice is Ibotta. Anytime you go to the grocery store, movie theatre, or a restaurant check and see if your purchase is eligible for a rebate. If so, claim it and you’re done! The cash out is low at $5. I typically make around $15 a month just by going to the grocery store. It’s not a lot, but if you add it up over a year it could be a nice way to purchase a Christmas present, or help with curriculum. Swagbucks has many different options to help you earn points. You can take surveys, shop online, print coupons, and watch videos.  You then can cash your points out for gift cards to places like Wal-Mart and Amazon. I have used them before, and could earn $5 or so a month if I remember to use them.

In Home Child Care- I ran an in-home daycare for 7 years. It was chaotic but a lot of fun! The kids liked having friends over all the time, and it brings in a good amount of money. Check with your local job and family services for licensing information.

Freelancing-This is what I do now, and I love it! Good places to get started freelancing are Odesk and Elance. If you enjoy writing it is a great job to get into. The hours are flexible, and the pay isn’t bad.

Virtual Assistant- I have done this before, and it is not bad. You work behind the “scenes” for bloggers, authors, or curriculum companies. It is somewhat difficult to find VA jobs, but you can find some on Odesk, or by following blogs like Money Saving Mom. VA’s are responsible for sending and responding to emails, scheduling blog posts, customer service work and anything else their client may want them to do.

Selling Homemade Items-If you are crafty, can sew, or are great at making stuff look into selling your items. Websites like Etsy are taking off like crazy! Moms can list their items for sale and make a good profit. I have friends who crochet hats and scarves and sell them on Facebook at Christmas, I also have friends who paint signs, or make crafts, then sell them at flea markets. There are really no limits to how you can sell your items. You just need to be a little creative (which I’m not, so I haven’t tried this one). However, I promise it works if you are!

These are just a few ways that homeschool moms can help contribute to their family’s income. I hope that one of them can work for you!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

Tips for Homeschooling Your ADHD Child

Tips for Homeschooling your ADHD child

Homeschooling provides parents with a chance to cater to their child’s learning abilities. It provides students a chance to learn at their own pace, and not be tied up in a classroom for a full day. Homeschooling provides those students who have difficulty in classroom settings to thrive. This is the case for the ADHD child.

Children with ADHD tend to be fidgety, lack attention, and may have trouble comprehending what is being said in a typical classroom. They are wired differently, and being in one room or required to sit still all day does not play to their learning abilities at all.

Children with ADHD do best when allowed to learn in an environment that caters to their needs and provides a one on one education. Children with ADHD tend to thrive in a homeschool environment.

Here are some tips that can help as you begin homeschooling your ADHD child:

Break up the tasks into smaller increments. This allows the material to be more manageable for your child. At the beginning of day you can give your child a checklist of what you will be covering that day. This allows them to focus more clearly because they are able to see what is coming next.

Minimize distractions. Find a quiet place for your child to learn. Make sure there is nothing distracting like lights that are flickering, or a desk full of items unrelatable to the task at hand. Children with ADHD need their work areas to be clear and organized, this helps them focus and stay on task.

Be creative. If the weather is nice, take a lesson outdoors. If this is not an option incorporate hands on activities into your lessons. Children with ADHD tend to be more kinesthetic learners. They benefit greatly from short lessons that allow them to use their bodies as well as their minds.

If you have an artistic child, allow them to draw while you are teaching. To you this may be distracting, but to them it helps them focus. It allows them a way to utilize their energy.

Another option is to let them respond to questions orally instead of on paper. Many children with ADHD find writing a challenge, and oral answers allow them to expedite the learning process. Even if a child with ADHD knows an answer, it is difficult for them to transfer that answer to paper.

Be patient. If your child asks you numerous questions or the same question many times, don’t assume they are not paying attention. Chances are they are trying to comprehend what you said and they really may not remember. Asking again helps them to hear the material a second time, giving them another chance to remember what you said.

Deciding to homeschool your ADHD child may have you feeling overwhelmed, but believe me you can do it! Hopefully these tips can help!

Misty Bailey is a Christian wife and homeschool mom. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.

 

 

How Do Homeschoolers Perform Long Term?

How do Homeschoolers perform long term

We already know that homeschool students perform well academically, but how do they do long term? Do they turn in to socially inept adults? Do they thrive at college? How do homeschoolers perform long term?

Do Homeschooled students go to college?

Yes! Over 74% of homeschooled graduates have taken some form of college level courses. Compare that to 46% of the general population.

How do homeschool students perform academically in college?

Compared to conventional students, college students who were homeschooled earn, on average a higher first year GPA (3.41) than the overall average (3.12) a higher fourth year GPA (3.46) than the overall average (3.16) and have a higher college graduation rate (66.7%) compared to the overall average (57.5%).

Once in College, how do homeschooled students do socially?

Recent studies have found that whether or not a student is homeschooled has no affect on their self esteem in college. However, these students do have a significantly lower rate of depression, and tend to rate their college experiences more positively than students who were not homeschooled.

Does the family bonds made by homeschooling last?

Yes! The bonds made with  family members during homeschooling, last a lifetime. Homeschooled children are more likely to adopt the behaviors and values of their family members because they are ones they spend the most time with.

Are Homeschoolers active in their communities after graduation?

Yes! Homeschool graduates tend to participate regularly in community services. They are also 50% more likely to be members of organizations like a church or synagogue.

How do homeschoolers feel about homeschooling once they are adults?

The majority of adults who were homeschooled plan on homeschooling their own children. They also tend to have no negative feelings about their education.

So, if you have been wondering what the long term affects of homeschooling are I hope this has given you some peace about your decision. I have found no long term disadvantages of homeschooling. Homeschooling is a great education choice for many families, and the advantages will always outweigh the doubts you may have!

Misty Bailey is a wife to Roger and a homeschool mom to three beautiful blessings. She resides with her family in Southern Ohio. She loves helping new homeschoolers and has a Homeschool 101 eBook for those getting started. She shares her struggles with time management, becoming unglued and finding joy in the everyday moments on her blog Joy in the Journey.